Wednesday, June 14, 2017

#FiveSibes Honor U.S. Flag Day


It is Flag Day here in the United States. Our American flag represents freedom and is a symbol of our nation's pride, and as such, it greatly revered. I remember stories told by my father, a proud WWII veteran, of what it meant to the troops when they saw our flag. Throughout history, our American flag has brought pride and tears (of respect, sorrow for loss, and joy) whenever this beautiful red, white, and blue banner waves. 

There are specific ways in which to display our American flag. In 1995, I was the publicity and media liaison for our city's WWII 50th Anniversary Commemorative Committee, working closely with veterans and our Kingston City School District to bring a living history about World War II and the role our veterans and homefront heroes played during that time to the district's students. I volunteered in my daughter's elementary school, and worked closely with the administration, teachers, veterans, and the media.  

One of the committee members and driving force behind educating the young on the history of this era, was U.S. Army Veteran Dick Williams, also know in our county as "Mr. Flag." He was dubbed Mr. Flag for his generosity of not only donating flags to schools, veterans, and cemeteries, as well as collecting and respectfully disposing of old flags in our area, but also for his education of WWII and our heroes, and the proper handling of our U.S. Flag. Through him, I learned much, and also joined him in his efforts to help to teach the school children of future generations about our flag etiquette. It was a privilege to know Mr. Williams, work beside him, and call him friend for so many years. (To meet "Mr. Flag" and read more about our time on the committee, visit HERE). In his honor, I carry on awareness for proper flag etiquette.



According to the U.S. Government Department of Veterans Affairs:

"When carried in procession with other flags the U.S. flag should be either on the marching right (the flag’s right) or to the front and center of the flag line. 
 
When displayed  on a float in a parade, the flag should be hung from a staff or suspended so it falls
free. It should not be draped over a vehicle.
 
When displayed with another flag against a wall from crossed staffs, the U.S. flag should be on its own right (left to a person facing the wall) and its staff should be in front of the other flag’s staff.
 
In a group of flags displayed from staffs, the U.S. flag should be at the center and the highest point.
 
When the U.S. flag is displayed other than from a staff, it should be displayed flat, or suspended so that its folds fall free. 
 
When displayed over a street, place the union so it faces north or east, depending upon the direction of the street.
 
When the U.S. flag is displayed from as projecting from a building, the union of the flag should be placed at the peak of the unless the flag is at half-
staff. 
 
When suspended from a rope extending from the building on a pole, the flag should be hoisted out, union first from the building.
 
When flags of states, cities or organizations are flown on the same staff, the U.S. flag
must be at the top (except during church
services conducted at sea by Navy
chaplains). 
 
The flag should never be draped or drawn back in folds. Draped red, white and blue bunting should be used for decoration, with the blue at the top and red at the bottom.
 
The flag may be flown at half-staff to honor a newly deceased federal or state government official by order of the president or the governor, respectively. On Memorial Day, the flag should be displayed at half-staff until noon."


Would you like more information on our flag? 
Visit the USA Flag Site HERE

You can download a printable flyer courtesy of the Missouri American Legion HERE.

 

Do you have your flag flown correctly? 




10 comments:

  1. Thanks for sharing these tips about proper flag etiquette for Flag Day. Both my father and grandfather served and fought for this country, so the American Flag holds an extra special place in our family's hearts. Loved learning about Mr. Flag too, what a cool guy :)

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  2. Thank you for the flat etiquette lesson! I must admit that I apparently do not have our flag hung correctly. Need to go fix it! Happy Flag Day!

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  3. when I was a little girl, I was a Girl Scout. At summer camp they would start each day raising the flag, and end each day by lowering it, and folding it. (We were taught the correct, military way to fold the flag) All the while Taps would play. I wonder if they still teach Girl Scouts how to perform this ceremony? I hope they do, it teaches children respect for our country's flag.

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  4. I had no idea it was Flag Day. Thanks for the interesting tips. Some I've heard but most was not aware of. Although the US has a complex history, I am honored and grateful that there are those (veterans) that lay their lives down for the flag/country. Much respect.

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  5. Happy Flag Day! I didn't even know it was Flag Day, I confess I've never actually observed Flag Day. Thanks for sharing this information and the story of Mr. Flag, he seems like quite a gentleman!
    Love & Biscuits,
    Dogs Luv Us and We Luv Them

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  6. Thank you for sharing this information about our flag. I knew some of the information but much was new to me.

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  7. I wonder if these rules are true for all nations. I suspect they are ... or at the very least similar. I know that the Canadian lapel pin can only be worn on the left lapel.

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  8. That was a wonderful post and we enjoyed the bit of history!

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  9. Thank you for sharing the proper flag etiquette about displaying the red, white & blue. Wish more people did it and those who do did it correctly. 🇺🇸

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  10. I am always surprised when I notice someone displaying the flag incorrectly.
    My dad was in the military, so all of the movies I went to were on base. I was probably 13 or so when I went to a regular movie and was shocked that they didn't play the National Anthem before the movie.

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